Long Grove Historical Society http://LongGroveHistory.org Save The Bridge! Mon, 18 Dec 2017 04:57:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8 http://s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/lghsmedia/lghs/wp-content/uploads/2017/06/12155205/cropped-lghsLogo512Square-1-32x32.png Long Grove Historical Society http://LongGroveHistory.org 32 32 2018 Membership Drive http://LongGroveHistory.org/2018-membership-drive/ Mon, 18 Dec 2017 04:54:34 +0000 http://LongGroveHistory.org/?p=812 Time to get on the bandwagon for 2018... renew or join now!

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Get on the 2018 bandwagon now by renewing or joining using the instructions on our membership webpage.

 

In the mid-1800’s when the circus came to town, the first thing they would do, even before setting up camp, was to have a splashy parade down the main street. The bandwagon carried musicians and was one of the most ornate items on parade.

Before long, politicians saw an opportunity and would rent the bandwagons and use them to ride through town as a form of campaigning. As a candidate gained popularity, other politicians would “jump on the bandwagon” and ride along to associate themselves with the campaign.

Today, we generically use the term “jump on the bandwagon” to mean join in on something that’s established or gaining in momentum. Our 2018 membership drive is just that – we’re off to the best start we’ve had in recent memories and are hoping this will be a record year for us. Hop on!

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Hooligan http://LongGroveHistory.org/hooligan/ Sun, 17 Dec 2017 20:37:30 +0000 http://LongGroveHistory.org/?p=805 Origins of the word hooligan.

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Houligan

Ever wonder why we refer to someone up to no good as a “hooligan”?

It’s a fairly recent word, having originated circa 1850. In London at that time the Irish surnames O’Houligan and O’Houlihan were very common. It was not uncommon to see newspaper reports of petty crimes were the person apprehended carried one of these two surnames. The short form of the name became generic slang for a criminal.

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The Coffee Bean http://LongGroveHistory.org/the-coffee-bean/ Sun, 17 Dec 2017 19:36:28 +0000 http://LongGroveHistory.org/?p=789 How Long Grove resident Gloria Jean Kvetko started Gloria Jean's Coffee Bean.

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This Long Grove History article appeared in the December, 2017 issue of Long Grove Living magazine.

Once upon a time, Kaldi, an Ethiopian goat herder, noticed his goats dancing with unusual fervor after eating the red fruit of the coffee shrub. He tried some beans himself, and he too, had more pep in his step. He shared the discovery with some local monks and they tried boiling the bean and drinking the result, and then noticed they were unable to sleep that night. Coffee and humans have been intertwined ever since.

America got its first commercial coffee roaster in 1793. Beans were hard to come by and expensive, so coffee was really only something for the wealthy elite. The advent of steamships improved the supply and quality and brought the price down to something most people could afford. After World War II, production in Central America boomed, and by the 1950’s, coffee was an everyday staple in homes throughout the country.

Maybe you’re like me and remember coffee coming in those big red tins with name brands like Hills Brothers. While this was, no doubt, an efficient way of getting coffee consumed by the masses, it wasn’t the tastiest end product. By the late 1970’s, a space in the market was opening up for specialty and gourmet offerings.

In our neck of the woods, there was a young enterprising mom from a gritty Chicago neighborhood, busy with her successful beauty parlor, but chasing her dream of a custom home. She had acquired a lot in Long Grove, and as her savings accumulated, the idea of opening a second business in the quaint little town of Long Grove became a passion. Back then, there were no available store fronts, and if you wanted a store, you had to grab one the moment someone decided to close up shop. The first one to come available for our young mom was the Coffee Bean. It was located across from Red Oaks in what had been a garage. The little shop sold antiques and coffee beans. The antiques were sold off and coffee beans and the trappings to grind and brew them became the sole focus. For variety, she started making her own flavored beans, which was unheard of at the time.

She was on to something – people were buying it, and the word spread. Woodfield mall called asking for her to open a store. Then Northbrook court called. Then Randhurst mall. This was big. For legal purposes, Coffee Bean was too common a name, so the lawyer suggested they prefix it with their own name. Her husband Ed suggested Ed’s Coffee Bean, but the young mom’s middle name was Jean and that rhymed with bean, so Gloria Jean’s Coffee Bean it was. Over the next dozen years, well over a hundred stores opened around the country. Long Grove resident Gloria Kvetko had turned Gloria Jean’s Coffee Bean into the most recognized coffee franchise in America.

In 1993, an offer she couldn’t refuse for the company was put forth, and, somewhat reluctantly, she sold her coffee empire in 1993. The new owners eventually ran into difficulty, but the brand remained strong and positive, and today, under new owners yet again, it’s making a comeback.

The little Long Grove garage that was store #1 was sold as well. The new owner Karen Krahn, renamed it Beans and Leaves. A couple of years ago the store was acquired by Ethel Berger. Ethel has recently started working with the Long Grove Confectionary to create a new coffee shop next to Towner Green, to be called The Long Grove Coffee Company.  A new company is moving into the little garage that Ethel vacated and will offer coffee and ice cream. The name Covered Bridge Creamery will now adorn the little garage.

Gloria Jean is happy to share her experiences and did so recently with a group of downtown merchants. Pictured is Gloria Jean with one of Long Grove’s current female entrepreneurs, Joanie Shunia, of Joanie’s Pizza. While Joanie currently doesn’t have any national expansion plans, you never know. Perhaps you should grab a slice now, so you’ll have bragging rights if Joanie’s Pizza ever becomes the household word that Gloria Jean’s Coffee Bean did.

This month’s Save the Bridge limerick is a nod to that magical power that beckoned Gloria Jean to choose Long Grove to launch her business:

The old bridge over Buffalo Creek
Is what makes our town unique
It’s the history
And the mystery
And the charm that customers seek

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Tamarack High School http://LongGroveHistory.org/tamarack-high-school/ Wed, 15 Nov 2017 20:04:26 +0000 http://LongGroveHistory.org/?p=797 How Stevenson High School got it's name.

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This Long Grove History article appeared in the November, 2017 issue of Long Grove Living magazine.

Historical societies like to enumerate the occasions and times a U.S. President has visited their town. That’s tough for Long Grove – the “Grant spent a night at the Long Grove Hotel” rumor doesn’t seem to hold water. Kennedy was in Barrington during his Presidential campaign, but no evidence he even drove through here coming or going. Lincoln was obviously in the area a few times, but no joy with him either. Reagan was living downstate as late as the 1930’s, but seems there’s no reason for a downstate college age kid to pay a sleepy country crossroads a visit.

Expand the circle to include Presidential candidates and it gets more interesting. Adlai E. Stevenson II was born in Bloomington, IL, but moved as a young married man to Mettawa in the 1930’s. He called Mettawa home until his death in 1965. Somewhere in those thirty years, it seems likely he found occasion to drive the two miles and pay Long Grove a visit.

Stevenson was Illinois governor from 1949 to 1953, and was the Democratic Presidential candidate that ran against Dwight Eisenhower in 1952 and 1956. He also ran for President in 1960, but lost out to Kennedy in the Democratic Primaries. Kennedy later appointed him UN Ambassador and Adlai died in that post in 1965.

It is election day morning, 1956, and you flip on the TV. Hey, that looks like Long Grovian Mibs Hill registering Presidential Candidate Adlai E. Stevenson II at the polling place in Half Day. And look, Mrs. Ferry from Long Grove is putting an “I Voted” sticker on his lapel. Helicopters swirl overhead and the lights and equipment from ABC, CBS, and NBC dwarf the little polling place. Some nine years later, when a high school was erected within a few hundred yards of that spot, it was to be called Tamarack High School, after a tree that was present there. People pointed out that the Tamarack wasn’t a valuable or desired tree, so maybe not such a good name. Stevenson High School was proposed, but that got political push back from the community’s Republican majority, who argued it was improper to name the school after a living person. The naming was postponed until the next school board meeting. In the intervening time between the two meetings, Stevenson died. Fate had interceded and chosen the name.

Mettawa’s Adlai E. Stevenson the second came from a family of statesman. Adlai the first, was US Vice President under Grover Cleveland. Aldai the third was a US Senator from Illinois. Counting Stevenson’s can be a little deceptive, though, as Adlai the second’s father is named Lewis. The Stevenson male line goes like this – Adlai I – Lewis – Adlai II – Adlai III. Despite the name handicap, Lewis was also a successful politician, serving a term as Illinois Secretary of State. You have to wonder if Lewis ever felt somehow slighted for being stuck in the middle of all these Adlai’s without being properly enumerated. And yes, there are more modern day Adlai’s. Adlai the fourth did not go into politics, and had commented that he wished his name was “Adlai the last”. Somewhere old Lewis is smiling. Nonetheless, Four christened his first born son as Adlai the Fifth.

Stevenson’s home is the only place in Vernon Township on the National Register of Historic Places. We’re rooting for our Long Grove Bridge to be the second. The Lions Club recently turned the whole downtown into a mini-golf course for a day (pictured). Green fees were all donated to the Save The Bridge Fund. Way to go, Lions! This month’s Save The Bridge limerick is a nod towards maintenance, to keep our most historic thing looking spiffy:

Our bridge might be too old
To uphold much weight in the cold
But a little care
A weld here or there
Will have her back good as gold

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Yuletide Sing http://LongGroveHistory.org/yuletide-sing/ Wed, 08 Nov 2017 19:34:56 +0000 http://LongGroveHistory.org/?p=784 The post Yuletide Sing appeared first on Long Grove Historical Society.

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Yuletide Sing

Join fellow residents and local scouting troops for this joyous celebration of the holiday season. Bring your voice and your family and enjoy some hot chocolate and treats as well. Bundle up as we’ll be outdoors to fully enjoy the spirit of the season. The event will be held on the Historical Society Farmhouse Patio, which is in the back corner of the Stempel Parking Lot, in downtown Long Grove. It will start at 6pm on Saturday, December 9th, 2017.

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National Historic Register News Expected 1Q18 http://LongGroveHistory.org/national-historic-register-news-expected-1q18/ Wed, 18 Oct 2017 13:50:43 +0000 http://LongGroveHistory.org/?p=775 An update regarding the National Register Listing of Long Grove's historic bridge is expected the first quarter of 2018.

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The National Park Service has completed their initial review of the application to have the bridge listed on the National Historic Register. They’ve asked the state to supply some additional information:

  • More information regarding other Illinois bridges of this type
  • Some additional diagrams/photos showing the bridges architecture

We are currently working with the state to supply the additional information to the NPS and, considering the upcoming holiday season, we likely won’t hear back regarding further review until the first quarter of next year.

The listing process is an iterative and interactive one. The application went through a number of iterations with State Historians before being submitted for federal review. You always hope that the current iteration is the last and final one, but each new historian reviewer brings their own experiences and interests into what’s significant and worthy of more elaboration. The application itself plays a role in documenting our national history, so all involved want to take their time and get it right. The good news is that with this being the last level of review, the end is in sight, even if it’s a little difficult to predict exactly when we’ll get there.

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Long Grove’s First Doctor http://LongGroveHistory.org/long-groves-first-doctor/ Sun, 15 Oct 2017 20:11:57 +0000 http://LongGroveHistory.org/?p=802 The first doctor in the Long Grove area.

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The following Long Grove History article appeared in the October, 2017 issue of Long Grove Living Magazine.

Tony Stencel and Family with the painting he donated to help save the covered bridge.

If you were an early 1840’s settler of Long Grove, and asked the question, “How do I get to the doctor?” the answer, to borrow from an old joke, might well have been, “Well, to get to the doctor, I sure wouldn’t start from here!” With such sparse population, in those days you waited for the doctor to come to you. Early doctors traveled extensively and rode a circuit on horseback through the area they served. Settlers who needed care knew the route, and would leave word that a visit was needed, and the doctor would detour  to make the house call.

The first doctor in the area was John Kenicott with a circuit of some thirty or so miles that involved as many as five different horses. Legend has it that he had a special saddle made that allowed him to sleep while on the horse. Payment would have been something in trade as often as it was money. Treatment was not enjoyable, as the prevailing attitude at the time was, “no pain, no gain”, and harsher, more painful treatments were thought to have greater healing power. Bloodletting was a common cure all. Rudimentary surgery was performed right then and there, though was limited to the patient’s pain tolerance, as there was no anesthesia. In the early 1840’s, chloroform and ether came into use, but they could be tricky to administer correctly. There are many deceased fruit flies from my high school science career that can attest to that.

Rumor has it that an old, somewhat crazy, doctor from the past will be performing on patients during the Historical Society’s Annual Ghost Walk. The Walk will be Friday night, October 27th, and advanced tickets from LongGroveHistory.org are required.  Perhaps the creepiest setting on the walk is the Covered Bridge trail, with unknown ghoulies lurking about. In that spirit, this month’s Save The Bridge poem has a darker tone:

Our Bridge of myth and wonder
Shall no one put her asunder
Summoning wit and charm
We’ll defend her from harm
And the trolls that lurk there under

You still have a few weeks to help Save The Bridge by purchasing a raffle ticket to win a beautiful original watercolor of the bridge. Pictured is Tony Stencil with his family and the bridge painting he donated to the cause. The winner will be drawn at the Ghost walk. Tickets can be purchased online at http://longgrovehistory.org/bridge-painting-raffle.

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Long Grove Times – #38 Fall, 2017 http://LongGroveHistory.org/long-grove-times-38-fall-2017/ Mon, 02 Oct 2017 02:03:27 +0000 http://LongGroveHistory.org/?p=726 Covered Bridge news pending, Ghost Walk Preparation, Lemmon Hill and an update on Sears Catalog Homes.

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#38 – Fall 2017

 

In this issue… we’re anxiously awaiting news regarding our application for National Register Status for the Historic Covered Bridge – get your raffle tickets for the upcoming drawing. Preparations are underway for our 5th annual Ghost Walk around the Historic Downtown – reservations are now open. We’ve got some more research into the Sears Catalog homes in Long Grove to share, as well.

Fifth Annual Long Grove Ghost Walk

Fancy a creepy historical walk around the coolest downtown in Lake County? Join the Long Grove Historical Society for their fifth annual Long Grove Ghost Walk! The ghosts will be there… will you?

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At the Drop of a Hat http://LongGroveHistory.org/at-the-drop-of-a-hat/ Sun, 01 Oct 2017 22:47:18 +0000 http://LongGroveHistory.org/?p=722 Where did the phrase "At the Drop of a Hat" come from?

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At the Drop of a Hat

Ever heard that somebody does something “at the drop of a hat”? The meaning is that it gets done immediately, and without much thought. But what does dropping a hat have to do with speed?

Apparently an old custom (perhaps Irish) was to use a hat drop to mark the start of a race. When the hat is dropped, they’re off – no hesitation.

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Sears Catalog Homes Update http://LongGroveHistory.org/sears-catalog-homes-update/ Sun, 01 Oct 2017 22:46:51 +0000 http://LongGroveHistory.org/?p=738 An update regarding the former owners of some of Long Grove's Sears Catalog homes.

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Last issue, a rumor of several local homes being “Sears Catalog Homes” was discussed in this article. An eyewitness stepped forward, one Randal G. “Randy” Towner, who was able to recall physically being present in these old homes when they still had that “fresh from the catalog” appearance. With Randy’s information the following history could be noted:

a) the current Cigars and More building was originally Walter Gosswiller’s home

b) the current State Farm building was occupied early on by the Weidner family

c) the current Scout and Forge building was occupied early on by the Opsal family

As was previously noted, these homes have been drastically altered over the years. Here’s a couple of old pictures of Walter Gosswiller’s home and what it looks like now as the Cigars and More shop:

 

If you’d like to take a look at the variety of homes sold by Sears, check out the antiquehome.org website.

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